Posts

Toolsmith #126: Adversary hunting with SOF-ELK

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As we celebrate Independence Day, I'm reminded that we honor what was, of course, an armed conflict. Today's realities, when we think about conflict, are quite different than the days of lining troops up across the field from each other, loading muskets, and flinging balls of lead into the fray.
We live in a world of asymmetrical battles, often conflicts that aren't always obvious in purpose and intent, and likely fought on multiple fronts. For one of the best reads on the topic, take the well spent time to read TJ O'Connor's The Jester Dynamic: A Lesson in Asymmetric Unmanaged Cyber Warfare. If you're reading this post, it's highly likely that your front is that of 1s and 0s, either as a blue team defender, or as a red team attacker. I live in this world every day of my life as a blue teamer at Microsoft, and as a joint forces cyber network operator. We are faced, each day, with overwhelming, excessive amounts of data, of varying quality, where the answer…

Toolsmith #125: ZAPR - OWASP ZAP API R Interface

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It is my sincere hope that when I say OWASP Zed Attack Proxy (ZAP), you say "Hell, yeah!" rather than "What's that?". This publication has been a longtime supporter, and so many brilliant contibutors and practitioners have lent to OWASP ZAPs growth, in addition to @psiinon's extraordinary project leadership. OWASP ZAP has been 1st or 2nd in the last four years of @ToolsWatch best tool survey's for a damned good reason. OWASP ZAP usage has been well documented and presented over the years, and the wiki gives you tons to consider as you explore OWASP ZAP user scenarios.
One of the more recent scenarios I've sought to explore recently is use of the OWASP ZAP API. The OWASP ZAP API is also well documented, more than enough detail to get you started, but consider a few use case scenarios.
First, there is a functional, clean OWASP ZAP API UI, that gives you a viewer's perspective as you contemplate programmatic opportunities. OWASP ZAP API interactio…

Toolsmith #124: Dripcap - Caffeinated Packet Analyzer

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Dripcap is a modern, graphical packet analyzer based on Electron.
Electron, you say? "Electron is a framework for creating native applications with web technologies like JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. It takes care of the hard parts so you can focus on the core of your application."
We should all be deeply familiar with the venerable Wireshark, as it has long been the forerunner for packet analysts seeking a graphical interface to their PCAPs. Occasionally though, it's interesting to explore alternatives. I've long loved NetworkMiner, and the likes of Microsoft Message Analyzer and Xplico each have unique benefits.
For basic users comfortabel with Wireshark, you'll likely find Dripcap somewhat rudimentary at this stage, but it does give you opportunities to explore packet captures at fundamental levels and learn without some of the feature crutches more robust tools offer.
However, for JavaScript developers,  Dripcap opens up a whole other world of possibilities. Giv…

Toolsmith Release Advisory: Sysmon v6 for Securitay

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Sysmon just keeps getting better.
I'm thrilled to mention that @markrussinovich and @mxatone have released Sysmon v6.
When I first discussed Sysmon v2 two years ago it offered users seven event types.
Oh, how it's grown in the last two years, now with 19 events, plus an error event.
From Mark's RSA presentation we see the current listing with the three new v6 events highlighted.


"This release of Sysmon, a background monitor that records activity to the event log for use in security incident detection and forensics, introduces an option that displays event schema, adds an event for Sysmon configuration changes, interprets and displays registry paths in their common format, and adds named pipe create and connection events."

Mark's presentation includes his basic event recommendations so as to run Sysmon optimally.

I strongly suggest you deploy using these recommendations.
A great way to get started is to use a Sysmon configuration template. Again, as Mark d…

Aikido & HolisticInfoSec™

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This is the 300th post to the HolisticInfoSec™ blog. Sparta, this isn't, but I thought it important to provide you with content in a warrior/philosopher mindset regardless. 
Your author is an Aikido practitioner, albeit a fledgling in practice, with so, so much to learn. While Aikido is often translated as "the way of unifying with life energy" or as "the way of harmonious spirit", I propose that the philosophies and principles inherent to Aikido have significant bearing on the practice of information security.
In addition to spending time in the dojo, there are numerous reference books specific to Aikido from which a student can learn. Among the best is Adele Westbrook and Oscar Ratti'sAikido and the Dynamic Sphere. All quotes and references that follow are drawn from this fine publication.
As an advocate for the practice of HolisticInfoSec™ (so much so, I trademarked it) the connectivity to Aikido is practically rhetorical, but allow me to provide you s…

The DFIR Hierarchy of Needs & Critical Security Controls

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As you weigh how best to improve your organization's digital forensics and incident response (DFIR) capabilities heading into 2017, consider Matt Swann's Incident Response Hierarchy of Needs. Likely, at some point in your career (or therapy 😉) you've heard reference to Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs. In summary, Maslow's terms,  physiological, safety, belongingness & love, esteem, self-actualization, and self-transcendence, describe a pattern that human motivations generally move through, a pattern that is well represented in the form of a pyramid.
Matt has made great use of this model to describe an Incident Response Hierarchy of Needs, through which your DFIR methods should move. I argue that his powerful description of capabilities extends to the whole of DFIR rather than response alone. From Matt's Github, "the Incident Response Hierarchy describes the capabilities that organizations must build to defend their business assets. Bottom capabilities a…

Toolsmith - GSE Edition: Image Steganography & StegExpose

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Cross-posted on the Internet Storm Center Diary.

Updated with contest winners 14 DEC. Congrats to:
Chrissy @SecAssistance
Owen Yang @HomingFromWork
Paul Craddy @pcraddy
Mason Pokladnik - Fellow STI grad
Elliot Harbin @klax0ff

In the last of a three part (Part 1-GCIH, Part 2-GCIA) series focused on tools I revisited during my GSE re-certification process, I thought it'd be timely and relevant to give you a bit of a walkthrough re: steganography tools. Steganography "represents the art and science of hiding information by embedding messages within other, seemingly harmless messages."
Stego has garnered quite a bit of attention again lately as party to both exploitation and exfiltration tactics. On 6 DEC 2016, ESET described millions of victims among readers of popular websites who had been targeted by the Stegano exploit kit hiding in pixels of malicious ads.
The Sucuri blog described credit card swipers in Magento sites on 17 OCT 2016, where attackers used image files as…